1545 Bushkill Street
Easton, PA 18042
Phone: (610) 258-5343
Fax: (610) 330-9100
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Service Schedule

Thursday, 7:25 am
Minyan

Friday, 8:00 pm
Shabbat Evening Services

Saturday, 9:30 am
Shabbat Morning Services

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Donate to Bnai Abraham

Your contribution helps support a wide range of BAS programs and activities that strengthen both our congregation and the larger community.
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Celebrate at
Bnai Abraham

Jewish WeddingFrom weddings and Bar/Bat Mitzvahs to business functions and lectures, our facility is a great setting and location for your special occasion.
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BAS Office Hours

Synagogue office is closed on Mondays and Fridays. Hours open: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm.

Bulletin Distribution

We are going green and
encourage bulletin distribution through email. We will also communicate emer-gencies and special events through email.
If you have not sent your email address to Bnai Abraham office staff, please submit it now.

If you would like family members or others to receive a copy of the bulletin, please send name, address, and $15 payment to Elaine at Bnai Abraham.

Religious School

BAS Religious School welcomes all children ages 1-8th grade to enrolll in 2009-2010 program. Everyone is welcome.
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Advertise in this Space!

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BAS Rabbi's Message

Message from Rabbi Daniel Stein

February, 2012

Groucho Marx’s game show “You Bet Your Life” always opened the same way: “Say the secret word,” Groucho would instruct the contestants, “and you win $100. It is a common word - something you say every day.” On cue, a duck, clad in a bowtie and coke–bottle glasses, would descend from the rafters, secret word mounted in its bill. I occasionally think of that duck when I attend meetings in our Jewish community or read articles in Forward, Commentary, or The Jewish Week. Surely he exists someplace, in a university archive, museum, or in the attic of a former NBC employee. Instead of “clock” or “yogurt,” I Imagine him clutching the word “continuity” in his shabby bill, and as such he is poised to present the great minds of the American Jewish community with $100 dollar bills, or at least Elgin American compacts, if not solutions to what appears to be the greatest issue facing us today.

Continuity, though, is a murky word. What Judaism(s?) does the Jewish establishment hope to pass on to my fellow members of Generation Y? Surely, as much as they want Judaism to endure, there are likely elements that they hope would go away. I think of the neutral karta—members of the Sutmar Chassidic dynasty that oppose the existence of the Jewish state. There are likely very few Jews who hope that those values long endure. The question of continuity, though, becomes more complex when we turn the lens on our own community. What is it about Judaism that we value at Bnai Abraham? What are the values that we hope to transfer to a new generation?

When I posed this question recently to our Board, I was impressed by the thoughtful responses that I heard. Members of our Board feel strongly that Bnai Abraham provides an approach to Conservative Judaism unique in the Lehigh Valley. We are an intimate community, where we are fortunate to know each other well. We rely heavily on volunteerism, and all contributions are valued as essential to the ongoing success of our community, Easton, where, for over 200 years vibrant Jewish life has flourished. Finally, we are committed to providing a gathering space where Jews can come together in celebrations and support each other during difficult times.

This conversation, I think, is vital to our success as a community. We all agree (I hope) that a Jewish voice in Easton remains essential. The question, though, is how that voice should sound. As always, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this question: what would you like our community to look like in 5, 10, or 20 years? Thoughts? Post them to our facebook page or email rabbi@bnaiabraham.org.

Best wishes for a meaningful month,

Rabbi Stein