1545 Bushkill Street
Easton, PA 18042
Phone: (610) 258-5343
Fax: (610) 330-9100
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Service Schedule

Thursday, 7:25 am
Minyan

Friday, 8:00 pm
Shabbat Evening Services

Saturday, 9:30 am
Shabbat Morning Services

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Jewish WeddingFrom weddings and Bar/Bat Mitzvahs to business functions and lectures, our facility is a great setting and location for your special occasion.
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BAS Office Hours

Synagogue office is closed on Mondays and Fridays. Hours open: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm.

Bulletin Distribution

We are going green and
encourage bulletin distribution through email. We will also communicate emer-gencies and special events through email.
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Religious School

BAS Religious School welcomes all children ages 1-8th grade to enrolll in 2009-2010 program. Everyone is welcome.
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BAS Rabbi's Message

Rabbi's Message Archive

January, 2014

As you may have read in the press, the Obama administration has recently initiated a new round of peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians. As American Jews, we are likely to be asked questions about the talks; how should we formulate our answers? One of the ways I think we can do a better job is by having a deeper understanding of daily life in Israel. Thankfully, because of the internet, we have more access to Israeli media than ever before. In this month’s column, I wanted to give a little tour of my media consumption.

News Several years ago, the best Israeli news site--Haaretz--started charging a fee for many of its stories. I prefer not to pay for news, but it is still the best first stop. In Dena’s office, many of the staffers read the news blog “The Times of Israel.” If you are interested in a more hawkish stance, the Jerusalem Post remains a strong paper. Many of my friends on the left enjoy reading the +972 blog, an Israeli blog with a far left posture. Of course, for North American Judaism, the go-to source remains the Jewish Daily Forward. Television and Radio Many of the Israeli television stations stream content 24 hours a day, but unless you speak Hebrew, they are not deeply helpful. More enjoyable may be radio options--Israel’s popular Galgalatz Radio offers a mix of Israeli and American popular music. Israel’s IBA (the equivalent of the BBC) offers a daily 15-minute news broadcast in English www.iba.org.il/world/. Also in English is the new web-based startup i24news.tv. It offers English language news video 24 hours a day. Many of the online media companies are also offering subtitled Israeli programming; Hulu has the Israeli show Hatufim (Prisoners of War) available for free. The show follows the lives of three captives returning home from Lebanon; although it is violent, it is deeply compelling, and served as the inspiration for the hit show Homeland. For those who might be less inclined towards violence, two seasons of Srugim (meaning crocheted--a reference to kippot) are available on Amazon Prime Instant Video and Hulu Plus. The program follows the lives of 30-something Modern Orthodox singles living in Jerusalem, and is a kind of Orthodox “Friends.”

Film Several interesting Israeli films are available online. Netflix offers the Academy Award-nominated “5 Broken Cameras.” A coproduction of an Israeli and a Palestinian, it follows a non-violent Palestinian movement, offers an insight--although biased--into the daily lives of Palestinians living in the West Bank. Amazon Prime offers, among many other options, “Waltz with Bashir,” the animated feature about a man coming to terms with the First Lebanon War. Ultimately, the best way to understand Israel is to visit. But short of a lengthy and expensive trip, these resources offer us unprecedented access to Israel and its culture. They provide a compelling and thought-provoking way to spend a cold winter night.

Best wishes for a happy new year,

Rabbi Stein